Compounding for Bad Breath

CPBH Of course, you can have bad breath (halitosis) after you eat onions or garlic, but chronic bad breath is usually caused by the buildup of bacteria or yeast/candida within your body. Bad breath can also be caused by disease, gastrointestinal and/or upper respiratory tract disorders, buildup on your tongue, dry mouth or dental plaque.

To eliminate bad breath, you have to eliminate the cause. Bacteria, yeast and candida feed off sugar and grains. Modify your diet to eliminate sugar and processed foods. Eat probiotic-rich foods like kefir, sauerkraut, kimchi, kombucha, and more healthy fats like coconut oil. Also add a high quality probiotic supplement to restore good bacteria in your gut.

Dry mouth (xerostomia) also can cause bad breath. Several medication may cause dry mouth as a side effect. Saliva is needed to moisten the mouth, neutralize acids produced by plaque on teeth, and wash away dead cells that accumulate on the tongue, gums, and cheeks. If not removed, these cells decompose and can cause bad breath. Drinking at least eight eight-ounce glasses of water per day can help.

Due to its effectiveness against bacteria known as anaerobes, which have the greatest odor potential, the antibiotic metronidazole has been used for treating bad breath associated with ulcerative gingivitis and periodontal disease. A single dose of one tablespoon (15 ml) of metronidazole mouthwash used as a rinse for 5 minutes and then expectorated (spit out) can reduce halitosis significantly by decreasing bacterial counts on the tongue surface. Metronidazole mouthwash may be an option for hospice patients or other patients who suffer from malignant ulcers of the mouth, since the ulcers are often associated with anaerobic bacteria. However, metronidazole mouthwash should not be used to treat bad breath in otherwise healthy people since its use could increase the risk of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria.

If you suffer from bad breath or other health problems that have not responded to traditional care, talk to our pharmacists to see how we can help.

 

Sourced by: Pattie Storey

Curing Insomnia

InsomniaWhat is Insomnia?

Insomnia is a condition where an individual can have a difficult time falling asleep or staying asleep. 30-40% of Americans have sleep issues each year. When sleep disorders last longer than one month, they are classified as a chronic sleep disorder. Scientists do not know why we sleep, but the lack of sleep can affect our mood, our physical wellness, and our overall happiness. REM sleep is the time when we tend to dream, and we should have several episodes of REM sleep each night. Failure to reach REM sleep will have a negative effect on regenerative hormones that are produced while we sleep.

The Natural Sleep Hormone – Melatonin

Melatonin is secreted at night when darkness is approaching and it causes us to become sleepy and lowers our body temperature. Many prescription medications can block the production of Melatonin. You can ask our pharmacists if the medications you are taking may be depleting Melatonin, making it difficult to fall asleep.

There are also lifestyle changes one can enact to improve the quality of sleep. If you have sleep issues, you should first examine the amount of caffeine you are consuming, especially at night. Alcohol will cause poor sleep, especially if taken in excess. To stimulate the production of Melatonin in the evening you should turn your lights down. Staring at computer screens, video games, or television just before bedtime can make Melatonin production difficult. Exercise can improve the quality of sleep, and eating meals too close to bedtime can adversely affect sleep.

Many individuals turn to prescription medications to try to address sleep disorders. However, these medications can become problematic as they can adversely affect the normal sleep cycle, especially the REM sleep cycle. We recommend starting with a quality sleep supplement to help restore the natural sleep rhythm. Magnesium is a mineral that acts as a calmative and helps our muscles relax, helping us to fall asleep more easily. Combinations of sleep-inducing ingredients such as magnesium, Melatonin, Valerian root, passionflower, and L-Theanine can induce a natural sleep onset. L-Theanine is a unique amino acid that acts as a calmative for us when taken during the day, but can help to improve sleep when taken at bedtime. L-Theanine is especially useful for those individuals who only sleep 4-5 hours a night.

If you have sleep problems, we invite you to ask our pharmacists for safe and effective recommendations to help you restore your natural sleep cycle.

8 Facts About Heart Health

heart diseaseFebruary is National American Heart Month which makes it a great time to raise awareness about heart disease and other heart-related issues to ensure that your heart stays healthy for years to come.

Studies show that heart disease is the leading cause of death for Americans. Therefore, it’s vital to educate yourself on how to lower your risk. Keep the following heart-related facts in mind this month so you can learn healthy habits for the future.

1. Ten Minutes of Exercise Helps Your Heart

Simply ten minutes of physical activity each day can lower your risk of having a heart attack significantly. Aiming for thirty minutes a day could potentially lower your risk even more.

2. Less Screen Time is Heart Healthy

If you tend to spend four or more hours per day sitting in front of your TV, computer, laptop or other device, your risk of having a heart attack is almost double. Limit screen time and spend more time on your feet to reduce this risk.

3. Heart Disease Starts Early

Heart disease isn’t something that develops when you’re older. In fact, it starts when you’re a teenager or young adult. Being obese during childhood can make the risk of having heart disease even higher when you become an adult.

4. Stress and Heart Disease Go Hand in Hand

Stress is one of the biggest factors that leads to heart disease. Find ways to reduce stress, such as deep breathing. Learn to keep your anger in check in order to lower your risk of having a heart attack.

5. More Sleep Is Better for Your Heart

Those who get more sleep each night have a lower risk of heart disease. Women who get less than five hours of sleep, have a 39 percent chance higher of having heart disease.

6. Laughter Protects Your Heart

Laughing is healthy for your blood vessels. It helps them relax and expand, which keeps your heart working properly.

7. Heart Disease Fatality Rates Are High

Heart disease fatality rates are around 40 percent, which is higher than deaths associated with all types of cancer. More than 25,000 people in the U.S. die from heart disease every day.

8. Age is the Biggest Risk Factor

Although heart disease can start when you are young, age is the biggest risk factor. Other risk factors include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, smoking and a sedentary lifestyle. Even though you can’t control certain risk factors, such as a family history of heart disease, making healthy lifestyle changes can help reduce your risk overall.

If you want more information on how to keep your heart healthy, contact The Compounding Pharmacy of Beverly Hills. We can also help you out if you are on different medications and are interested in prescription consolidation.

Sports Medicine Compounding

football_helmet_medical_care_first_aid_medicine_thinkstock_76800167-100579749-primary.idgePutting the Warrior Back in “Weekend Warrior”

As we grow older, our competitive spirit rarely falters. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for our bodies. Recovery times that used to entail a few hours now seem to entail a few days; or worse weeks. If you are experiencing pain and discomfort while participating in your favorite sporting activity we may be able to help you, so that you can continue to enjoy the sports that you love for as long as possible.

Compounding for Common Sports Related Injuries

Our compounding pharmacists have the ability to compound medications that treat the following sports related injuries:

  • Connective Tissue Disorders
  • Muscle Soreness
  • Low Back Pain
  • Chronic Joint Pain
  • Tennis Elbow
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Osteoarthritis Pain
  • Sciatica
  • Ankle Sprain
  • Achilles Tendinopathy

And many more!

How We Can Help!

We have the ability to compound several types of medications in topical form that are made specifically for your unique circumstances; thereby creating a medication that is effective, well tolerated, and easy to use. We can also combine medications together into one delivery form, thereby increasing your chances of experiencing the greatest pain relief; and getting you back on the court/field/track as soon as possible. Topical medication administration has been used for decades, and some potential advantages of utilizing topical medications for sports related injuries include:

  • Ease of application
  • Achievement of efficacy with a lower dose
  • Site specific drug delivery
  • Improved patient compliance and adherence
  • Avoidance of risks associated with oral administration
Don’t let your pain keep you from living the quality of life you’d like to! For more information on how we can help you, please call and ask to speak with one of our compounding pharmacists. You’ll be glad you did!

New Year’s Health Resolutions

2019

The new year offers everyone another opportunity to make healthier choices for themselves and their loved ones.

The American Medical Association has offered 10 health recommendations to help patients “determine where they can make the most impactful, long-lasting improvements in their health.”

Avoid sugary drinks. Nothing hits the sweet spot like anhydrous dextrose. That is just one of a long list of sweeteners frequently added to drinks that make it easy to add unneeded calories to your diet. One 20-ounce sports drink has 122 calories of added sugars while a 12-ounce can of regular soda has 126 calories of added sugars. Instead, try drinking water, coffee, unsweetened tea or other calorie-free drinks. When you do drink beverages with sugar, go for milk or all-fruit juices that boost your dairy or fruit intake.

Know your risk for type 2 diabetes. One in three Americans has prediabetes, yet only one in 10 knows it. Prediabetes is a precursor to type 2 diabetes, with as many as 30 percent of patients with prediabetes progressing to diabetes within five years. Yet diabetes is not inevitable. Eating more healthfully, exercising regularly and losing between 5 and 7 percent of one’s body weight can prevent diabetes. Take a self-screening test now to determine your risk, talk to your physician and find out about widely available, evidence-based diabetes prevention programs that can help. Here are answers to frequently asked questions about prediabetes.

Move more. Every healthy adult between 18 and 65 years old needs at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity five days a week. These are activities in which you move your large muscles in a rhythmic manner for a sustained period. They include walking briskly, bicycling slowly or gardening. This kind of movement makes your heart beat more quickly and over time it makes your cardiovascular disease system healthier.

Another healthy alternative is to get at least 20 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity three days a week. This category includes jogging, running, swimming laps, singles’ tennis, dancing, cycling 10 mph or faster, jumping rope or uphill hiking.

Avoid processed food and added sodium. This is a category of unhealthy choices hidden right under our noses, in the form of many packaged foods such as meat, poultry, seafood, pasta, dressings, sauces, soups or gravies. You may, of course, consult the nutrition label to seek out lower-sodium options. A less confusing route is probably to opt for fresh, frozen or canned foods without any added sauces or seasonings. By seasoning your own food when you cook at home, you control how much sodium is used. And try out other herbs and spices to get the kick you want instead of shaking on more salt.

Know your blood pressure numbers. Visit LowerYourHBP.orgto find resources on understanding your numbers. Visit your physician and commit to a planto get your hypertension under control.

If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation. If you are a woman, that means up to one drink a day, and two drinks daily for men, as defined by the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans—which the AMA supports. And only adults of legal drinking age ought to drink alcohol. Keep in mind that not every drink equals “one drink,” depending on the alcohol content.

Talk with your doctor about tobacco use and quit. Your physician will help you drop the tobacco habit for good with evidence-based, Food and Drug Administration-approved cessation aids. Electronic cigarettes do not fall into that category. A U.S. surgeon general report notes that evidence for e-cigarettes as quit-smoking devices is lacking, adding that the “health impacts of frequent exposure to the toxicants in e-cigarette aerosol are not well understood, though several are known carcinogens.”

And while you’re at it, make your home and car smoke-free. Declaring this the policy of your abode and automobile can help eliminate your exposure—and the exposure of loved ones—to secondhand smoke. Giving friends, family and colleagues who are smokers one less place to light up may also encourage them to take the necessary step of quitting.

Manage stress. The good news on this front is that a good diet and daily exercise, as noted above, are key ingredients to maintaining and improving your mental health. So you are killing two birds with one stone by eating better and moving more. Another essential element on this front is to realize the power of saying “No.” It is never easy to do this, but taking better care of yourself will make you a better colleague and friend over the long run. Lastly, do not see it as a sign of weakness to ask for help from a friend or mental health professional when you need it. We are here for each other.

Safely store and properly dispose of all your prescription medications.If you are taking prescription opioids, follow your physician’s instructions and safely store those medicines. Among other things, medication safety in this area means that you should:

  • Organize and keep careful track of prescribed and over-the-counter medications. Keep stronger medicines separate from items more commonly found in medicine cabinets, keep medicines in the original bottle or container that it came in and never mix medications in the same bottle.
  • Keep medicines secure. Ensure that all lids close tightly, and treat medications like you would other valuables. Make sure they are concealed when guests or visitors are in your home. You may even consider installing a lock box in your medicine cabinet.

If you have any unused medication left over, you should properly dispose of it. Use this U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration search toolto locate nearby public drug-disposal locations.

Make sure your family is up-to-date on its immunizations. Work with your physician to ensure that you are all following the recommendationsof the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. And remember that it is not too late to get your flu shot. Here are six reasons patients give for avoiding flu vaccination—and how to counter them.

Sourced by:

Kevin B. O’Reilly

News Editor

American Medical Association